The Internet Game and How You Can Win It

Time to save some folks some more money. Since it’s that time of year for me again, today I’m going to do it by writing about how I play the internet game. Why didn’t I say the cable/internet game? Because cable is useless. You can get every show or movie with internet alone and as a bonus, there are no commercials in most cases. If live sports are your poison, those are often on over the air tv so you can get your fix in HD with a ten dollar antenna. They make fancy ones that cost ten times that much but if you read the reviews, you will likely conclude, as I have, that no one has ever topped the rabbit ears at any price point. You can even put them in your basement or attic, as I once did, so you don’t even have to look at them in your living room. If your live sports are not on over the air tv, you still have plenty of options – bars, friends’ houses, streaming, etc. In conclusion, no cable needed – and I didn’t even have to go into how the average person spends way too much time staring at a screen and should simply be doing it far less in the first place. Or Kodi for that matter…

Why do I call it the internet game? That’s all that most of life is. And that is certainly the case with internet service providers (ISPs). They lure customers in with a relatively reasonable rate, then double it a year later. The fewer customers fight back or do so successfully, the better the ISP does in the game. More profit equals winning. But you don’t want to fatten up an ISP’s profit margin and you don’t have to. Now in the internet game, there are only two basic scenarios – one easy and one slightly more difficult. But not to worry. I’ve experienced them both and both are beatable. You have scenario one if you live in a major metro area with more than one viable internet option. In other words, child’s play. Scenario two is when you have only one. And no, satellite and the like don’t count as options. Remember, we do not inconvenience ourselves in the name of saving money; we simply save money.

If you have options, as I do here in Houston, the game is already over the minute you show up. First, sign up for your “promotional rate” internet with AT&T. Bonus points if you negotiate an extra hundred dollar gift card out of them as I did last time to negate the unnecessary “installation fee” they charge for a technician to pay you an unnecessary visit. Remember, you are in the driver’s seat because there is competition. When they raise your rate a year later, look at what Comcast, or whatever other option you have, is offering. In this case, I’m about to save some money because they’re offering internet in my area for $30 instead of the $40 I’m paying now. Yay for me. Next, you call your current provider and tell them to cancel your account. When they ask why, simply tell them the truth; they jacked your rate up and there is a cheaper option available to you – so bye. They will probably transfer you to their retention department but that’s why you’ve done your homework. Stick to your guns unless they can beat your other option. There really is no more to it than that since your next call is actually going to be to your other option, which does exist. However, in this scenario, the retention department just might actually work hard to win your business because they know that. Going into the call, I know I’m going to save a minimum of $10 a month, but possibly more if their numbers are down and they’re feeling especially motivated today.

If you don’t have options, you can still win, but you have to be a little more creative. The game starts off the same way as above, but when your year is up, it changes. You can try negotiating with the retention department if you want to but again, they know the local market. So if you don’t have any better options, they are pretty unlikely to be in deal mode. But that’s ok. If you don’t get anywhere with them, simply cancel. Next, have your significant other call them and set up new service at the address. Don’t have one? Invent one. If they require a social security number or something over the top like that, have a friend call and return the favor for him or her. You get the point. This is war, people, so band together against the common enemy, which is anyone trying to rip you off. Once your alternate account name’s year is up, you can typically call and set up your own service again at the “promotional rate” since most ISPs purge your information from their system after six months.

That is the main game but here are a few other pointers.

1. If there is any kind of a modem/router rental fee charged, don’t pay it. You can usually buy a compatible setup for no more than $50-100 and they usually last at least a few years if not longer. Given that you’re avoiding a $10-15 a month rental fee plus taxes and fees being charged on top of it, this small “investment” pays for itself in less than a year.

2. Like all businesses, your ISP wants to make as much profit as possible. Its cost is whatever it takes to provide your service and its revenue is whatever it can get you to pay. Here’s the dirty secret: most of the cost is in setting up and maintaining the network. In other words, there is very little marginal cost between different speeds. And here’s another secret: most people need no more than 10-20 mbps – usually around the bottom rung of service that is offered. When they ask what you use the internet for, they’re listening for that magic phrase – streaming. That’s when they’ll say you need some ridiculous speed like 50 or even 100 mbps (depending on how gullible they’ve decided you are) and attempt to upsell you. If you let them fool you, you can quickly wind up paying way too much for internet. Go with the lowest speed that is offered and when they try to play the upselling game, tell them you use the internet exclusively for email and web browsing. At this point, they may try any number of low brow sales tactics and of course they would; the more they get you to pay, the more they get paid. Once again, stick to your guns. I promise the world will not end over this decision, no matter what they tell you.

3. Another note on speed is that sometimes the best deal isn’t advertised. When I was in Wisconsin, Time Warner (later acquired by Spectrum) used to offer a “budget plan” of maybe 3 or 5 mbps for $15. The next highest speed was about three times the price. As a bonus, it was somehow exempt from the “promotional rate” bullshit. I was able to keep it for years. I still fondly remember the day a sales woman from some company or other came to the door and asked what I was paying. I told her what I paid for internet and that I don’t pay for cable under any circumstances and she literally did an about face and headed for the next house without another word. Good times. But this plan wasn’t advertised on the Time Warner website. I happened to have heard about it from someone so I called and asked for it. After listening to a few minutes of the inside sales rep insisting I wouldn’t be able to do anything with my internet if I went with this horribly inadequate plan and ignoring it all, I was in business. And guess what. ISPs can’t perfectly control the speed you get. So even though 3-5mbps would have been adequate anyway, I often got double or triple the speed I was paying for – most likely a regression towards the mean situation. If you want to find out how much speed you are getting, you can find tons of online options by googling “speed test.” But in any case, it certainly doesn’t cost anything to try the slowest available speed and switch if it doesn’t work. Assuming it won’t work very well may cost you something. Assuming can do that in tons of different situations in life.

That should about cover it. If you’re paying more than $40-50 a month, you’re paying too much. By employing these three methods, you should be able to prevent that from ever happening. Adios for now.

Today I’m Going to Challenge You

It is no secret among those who know me that I have struggled with depression for most of my life. While it seems counterintuitive, there does appear to be a strong correlation between the prevalence of this problem and the unprecedented and continuing economic success our country has enjoyed. So if you struggle with it, there is absolutely nothing wrong with you. Most of us do, at least some of the time, and our circumstances in life really don’t seem to have a significant effect on that. As difficult as depression symptoms are to deal with, the sheer persistence of the disease in the face of long term, consistent efforts to eradicate it, has been the most frustrating aspect for me.

However, there is plenty to be hopeful about. Several months ago, I started making a more focused effort than ever to get my depression under control. First I had to accept, once and for all, that depression is a part of me and probably always will be. Acceptance is so important! As I understand it, suffering isn’t a direct result of circumstances, but rather, the result of the difference between those circumstances and one’s expectations. So in other words, anyone can be unhappy if he isn’t willing to accept reality. This is a large part of the explanation for miserable billionaires and happy people who don’t know where their next meals are coming from.

Accepting the reality that I will always have depression to contend with was a huge help. The next big step was taking responsibility for my own mental health. Too often in my life I’ve leaned on mental health professionals, thinking that if I invested enough time and money, I would have to see results. But just like with anything else, that isn’t enough. Simply going through the motions didn’t work for me. I wasted thousands of dollars in copays and hundreds of hours because I went in with the wrong mindset. The correct mindset, as in any situation, is to take responsibility – not for making the investment, but for attaining the RESULTS. When I finally did that around the middle of last year, I naturally started putting in the focused work that was necessary and everything changed.

What were my tactics? For one thing, I started reading with the specific purpose of defeating depression. Some of the books that really helped me include: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey, Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl, The Four Agreements by Miguel Ruiz, Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy by David Burns, Self-Compassion: The Power of Being Kind to Yourself by Kristin Neff, Resilience: Hard-Won Wisdom for Living a Better Life by Eric Greitens, Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALS Lead and Win by Jocko Willink and Leif Babin, and Mind Over Mood: Change How You Feel By Changing the Way You Think by Dennis Greenberger, Christine Padesky, and Aaron Beck. But beyond just reading, I started actively working on changing my thought process. There are hundreds of very worthwhile exercises and things to think about in just the books I listed and I highly recommend working through them all to find the ones that help you.

But reading books takes time. Today I want to challenge you to start with one simple, but incredibly powerful concept: gratitude. This isn’t the first time I’ve mentioned it in this young blog and that is no accident. Why is it so important? If you can change the way you think and start looking for positives instead of negatives, a few things will happen. Biologically, you will literally change your physical brain as you force it to work in different ways. That means that thinking positively will become easier with practice just like lifting weights does as your muscles get stronger. You will likely notice that your happiness level increases fairly quickly. But maybe the most exciting thing that will happen when you make it a priority to be thankful for the good things in your life is that you will get more of them. That’s right; changing the way you think will literally change your circumstances in life.

This isn’t some silly gimmick or pseudo-science. I’m not talking about thinking about things you want and the universe magically manifesting them for you. What I’m talking about is real. How does it work? When you start focusing on positive things in your life and being thankful for them, you will start to see more of them. This is human nature; you tend to find what you’re looking for and miss a lot of what you aren’t. When you start seeing more positive things, you start feeling better. When that happens, you start acting differently. You make an extra sales call. You meet a smoking hot girl and ask her out on the spot. Or maybe you just simply hold the door for someone. When you change your actions, your results start to change. Each of the examples I just listed can lead to something good happening for you and if you make enough changes like them, they certainly will. The first step to success is simply showing up and doing something. Success has a way of snowballing really quickly so literally all you have to do is start the process and ride the momentum from there and things will improve.

So how am I going to challenge you today? I want you to focus on making gratitude a part of your life. Immediately. In order for this to be as effective as possible, it needs to be obnoxious. Start keeping a notebook around or taking notes in your phone or whatever works for you. Every hour you’re awake, write down something you’re thankful for. Every single hour. I guarantee you can think of something. It can be as big as getting a promotion at work or as small as a conversation you had that you enjoyed. Still can’t find something? I bet you aren’t dying of cancer right now. I’ll bet even more that a tsunami didn’t just destroy your house and all your belongings. Try not to lean on the “it could always be worse” crutch too often but you can use it when you have to.

At the end of each day, review your list and pick out your favorites. Think about them as you lay in bed and go to sleep. There is no better way to start a night of restful sleep. Look back over previous days’ lists whenever you’re starting to feel down and remind yourself of some of the blessings in your life until the mood passes.

This exercise isn’t going to cure anyone’s depression. Much like alcoholism, I am not sure there is a cure. I think you just have to acknowledge that it exists and commit to fighting it every day. Do my gratitude challenge for a week or two and see how you feel. See if it is easier to come up with an item to add to the list than it was when you started. You are already going to notice progress and that is a money back guarantee! Obviously this doesn’t end your war. But it puts one battle in the win column. Next, pick out something else to try. Remember, big victories are made up of many little ones. If anyone decides to complete my challenge, I would love to hear about the results. So leave a comment or email me at admin@healthwealthpower.com and let me know how it worked for you.

Are You Wasting Hundreds a Year on Car Insurance?

While combing through a friend’s finances with him in search of savings opportunities recently, we struck gold with his car insurance. He is going to save hundreds of dollars over the next year as a result of making one minor change and at this point in his life, that will go a long way for him. In the process, I realized that car insurance is probably a large potential savings opportunity for a lot of people and I was inspired to write a post on the basics. Please note that I am no insurance expert and none of this, or anything in any other post for that matter, is intended as legal advice. But I do know a fair bit and I may be able to help point you in a direction that will save you some cash.

The first thing I tell anyone about insurance in general is that in many cases, loyalty counts for nothing. In my experience, the only reward for staying with a company long term is a consistent premium increase. This doesn’t necessarily apply to all companies but it also doesn’t cost you anything to get a few quotes to make sure your existing company is still competitive. I recommend doing so every couple of years or so. Companies seem to make fairly regular changes to the way they rate drivers, vehicles, etc, and the only way to find out about them is to shop around and see who is offering you the best deal today. Don’t assume that anything will be consistent from person to person or even from year to year for the same person. Numerous variables go into what premium is charged. Some agents seem to be very willing to shop around for you as a new customer but very reluctant to do so when you are already on the books. This has to do with their business model. However, just as with almost any other service, if you are less valuable as an existing customer than you were as a new one, become a new one again – for someone else.

Another important thing to look at with car insurance is your coverage itself. Liability coverage is required in most states now and is required by common sense and basic human decency everywhere. Sometimes the legal minimums are lower but I recommend at least 100/300 for bodily injury and 100 for property damage – and 200/400/200 wouldn’t be overkill either. Remember, if you run out of insurance coverage, you’re on the hook from that point on. And things can get expensive very quickly whether you’re paying to repair cars or people so skimping on this to save a few bucks on premiums could be a very painful decision in the long run. Liability coverage also benefits you in the form of uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage. There are simply far too many irresponsible people out there and as usual, people who make one bad decision, such as not having car insurance, tend to make others as well. In my relatively young life, I’ve already been rear ended by not one, but two uninsured drivers while stopped behind lines of cars at stoplights. It doesn’t get any more “not at fault” than that. In both cases, I was very glad to be covered by my own insurance company even though the drivers who hit me hadn’t had the decency to get coverage of their own.

So where can you save money on coverage? In the physical damage section. For this part, you need to consider both the car you’re driving and your financial situation. First of all, if your car is worth less than $5000, you may want to consider passing on collision coverage altogether. Of course, this means if you are in an at fault accident, you have to pay to repair the damage to your car. But most accidents are minor ones that involve little more than replacing a bumper, which is usually around $1000. Plus, if your car is worth that little, chances are you’re not going to repair minor damage anyway. So by not having the collision coverage, you’re really betting that you either won’t get in an at fault accident or that if you do, it will be a minor one. I like those odds. That said, if you don’t have a reasonable emergency fund of at least $5000, you may want to think twice about this.

Please note that if there is a lien on your car (in other words, if you have yet to pay it off), you cannot do this because it will put your loan in default status. You probably don’t want a visit from the friendly repo man anytime soon – even if your lender is likely to call and threaten you for a while before they go to that extreme.

If you want to follow a more minor version of the no collision coverage strategy that doesn’t put an auto loan in default, you can raise the deductible. Going from $500 to $1000 usually makes a decent difference in the premium. I have never seen going higher than $1000 do much of anything so I leave it there. This should pretty well confirm what I said above about most accidents amounting to a $1000 bumper replacement; insurance companies literally bet on it with their pricing.

Aside from coverage changes, there are a few other more traditional methods of lowering your car insurance premium. You can pay for six months at a time or annually if your insurance company offers that option. This usually saves you a little and offers the bonuses of both a head start on any credit cards you may be churning and locking in the premium for the full term you’re paying for. For example, I will only do a full year here in Houston since premiums are rising very quickly as insurers work to recoup their Harvey related losses. You can also get a discount for getting your car insurance from the same company as your homeowners/renters policy. You can talk to your agent to make sure you’re getting all the discounts you may be eligible for (good student, membership in certain associations, completed safety classes, etc). In the case of many insurers, you can also get a discount for letting them use a gps to monitor your driving habits. However, as a safe driver, but one who also likes to get where I’m going in a timely fashion, I’m always going to pass on that offer.

This obviously isn’t exhaustive of every possibility but hopefully it will give you an idea or two to try out. Good luck and safe travels out there!

Credit Card Fun – A Couple of Recent Developments

Happy weekend to you! A while back, I wrote a post about exactly how I use credit cards to make an extra $2k a year of tax free income. If you haven’t read it already, I recommend doing so now because parts of this post are going to build on it. I have a couple of minor changes to tell you about that are going to make things just a little bit better. This is a great example of a procedure I engage in periodically – redoing my research to make sure I am still getting the best deals available in every area of life.

The Bank of America Cash card recently prompted me to do this when it introduced a small upgrade. Now, instead of paying 3% on gas purchases, it will pay 3% on your choice of a handful of categories – gas, dining, travel, and some others. You can even change your selection as often as once a month. So if you have a vacation coming up, for example, simply switch your selection and boom – you’re now getting 3% on travel! The card will still pay 2% on Costco purchases. Please note that I’m sticking with the format of my last post in only listing the optimal bullet points. For example, I didn’t mention the 1% this card offers on the “all other” purchases category since the Citi Double Cash card already pays 2% there. In my case, of the new options, I was leaning towards rotating between dining and travel depending on how much travel I had planned for any given month. However, the situation suddenly became more complicated – in a good way.

Since as part of this I wouldn’t be earning 3% on gas purchases anymore, I decided to do a quick check to find out if there are any current offers that beat my default 2% for gas. The first stop on this search was www.doctorofcredit.com. This is an excellent financial hacker type blog that does a far better and more thorough job of covering credit cards, in particular, than I’ve seen anyone else do. And today the good doctor had some good news for me; there is a newcomer on the scene that will put a little extra money in my pocket!

The Wells Fargo Propel card, which apparently came out last year, has two claims to fame. First off, it appears to offer the largest sign up bonus (30k points/$300) of any credit card available that doesn’t charge an annual fee. Second, it pays 3% on a nice range of categories – travel, gas, dining, and streaming services. This is an excellent no fee card and it’s going to have a place in my wallet as soon as the snail mail can get it to me.

But here is the rub. The Bank of America Cash card, which prompted me to redo my research in the first place, is suddenly looking irrelevant. For those following along at home, the Wells Fargo Propel card covers each of the most valuable Bank of America Cash categories – except that instead of paying 3% on one of them at a time, it does so on all of them. So is the Bank of America Cash card facing the cruel fate of offering an upgrade and being rewarded with a “do not pass go, do not collect $200” style trip through my shredder?

Not so fast. Bank of America offers a 10% bonus if you redeem your rewards into one of their checking or savings accounts. So for every $100 I earn on the Bank of America Cash card, I get $110 if I put it into the savings account I already use to maximize the rewards of my Bank of America Better Balance Rewards card. There is also the Bank of America Preferred Rewards program that could give you bigger bonuses than that. But I am strictly a low effort level hacker so I will have to refer you to www.doctorofcredit.com if you want to learn more about that angle. In any case, that 10% bonus, plus the 2% paid on Costco purchases (the Wells Fargo Propel card is an Amex and Costco only accepts Visa right now), means the Bank of America Cash card will narrowly avoid the shredder although now it will only be used for whatever category I’ve chosen to pay 3% in any given month.

Keen observers of big business will probably note that the proximate timing of these two events is almost certainly no coincidence. This is how things work. So when one company does something of note, you should automatically be watching its competition because more likely than not, there will be a response and it may just benefit you.

So there you have it. One opportunity begets another. In this case the gain will be $300 this year plus a modest amount in the low hundreds in subsequent years. But given that applying for the Wells Fargo Propel card took me no more than five minutes and switching my Bank of America Cash category selection here and there will take me no more than that over the course of an entire year, this is still a more than worthwhile maneuver.  

Awesome Books I Recommend

Reading is a very rewarding aspect of my life. I believe that the day a person stops learning, he begins to lose relevance. Of course there are plenty of ways to learn but with reading, you can expand your knowledge in a very focused manner. You can then integrate this new knowledge into your life in all sorts of ways which will make you a more interesting and capable person. This will translate into a more successful and fulfilling life. Plus, reading a book while you drink coffee in the morning is a wonderful way to get your day off to a great start. Every now and again I will post a quick review of a book I really enjoyed and here is the first one.

The Consuming Instinct by Gad Saad (2011)

Gad Saad has made a name for himself by applying his study of the young, but revolutionary field of evolutionary psychology, to marketing. He also happens to be very adept at explaining very complex concepts so that even someone who is not naturally very scientifically inclined, such as the author of this post, can not only understand them, but feel them come alive. In this book, Saad examines the relationship between consumption and the sum of what we have all had bred into us over the course of human history. The kicker is that he defines consumption very broadly so in the course of the book, he ends up covering a wide range of human behaviors.

This book helped me to understand a lot of what doesn’t appear to make logical sense about the world. For example, junk food exists. It is literally garbage that makes us less healthy and we all know that. And yet we pay our hard earned money to buy it and put it in our bodies, often in ridiculous quantities. If this were a purely logical world, junk food would not be produced at all because there would be no market for it. Once you’ve read this book, you will understand why it happens anyway along with so many other things. Saad also delves into the recently socially dangerous, but ever relevant topic of the differences between the way males and females think and act. Once again, he has very valuable insight and suddenly a whole bevy of behaviors I have observed but never fully understood are starting to make more sense.

This is a book that will really get you thinking and that’s what makes it so valuable. Plenty of scientists could undoubtedly write a book full of concepts that would be worthwhile to learn but difficult for a layperson to understand. This particular book accomplishes the former but bypasses the latter in favor of being very engaging. Simply put, this book is a great teacher and if you read it, you will come away richer for the experience.

Movies I’ve Enjoyed Recently

Normally I’m lucky if I see a movie a month. But since my weekends right now involve being as inactive as possible for a while so my ankle can heal, here are my thoughts on the movies that have been part of the bright side of this situation thus far.  Oh. And also from this weekend; as a guy who is STILL bitter about the 09 Vikings loss to them in the NFC Championship, the Saints got screwed.

Deadpool 2 (2018)

I went into Deadpool 2 not knowing what to expect. Would it fall short of recapturing the lightning in a bottle its predecessor did as so many sequels of surprisingly excellent movies do? It was a very different time in my life when I watched the first one. Could I have changed so much since then that I would feel differently about the entire concept now even if it were executed very well again? I’m happy to say that those concerns were unfounded whether evaluating the movie relatively or on its own merits. Everything that made the first Deadpool great is not only preserved, but developed a little further. One of my favorite elements of the first movie was the juxtaposition of ridiculously violent scenes and music that just didn’t match them at all. That has been taken to about its limit in this one and it had me laughing as hard as I’ve laughed in a long time. The unapologetic irreverence and constant smart ass quips are still there and the timing and pace are just as good. All Deadpool’s friends are back (with the exception of Francis obviously) and he makes some compelling new ones as well. Minor spoiler alert: not all of the new characters last very long but their quick deaths are about as hilarious as deaths can be.

But beyond being rolling on the floor funny, the plot is where this movie really shines. This time it’s more complex than simply “good guys against bad guys” as not everyone is quite who they seem to be. The romantic relationship of every man’s dreams is still part of the movie but Mr. Wilson has to go on another hero’s journey rather than simply being allowed to enjoy it in peace. Ethical choices are presented and struggled with. Unlikely alliances are forged, broken, and forged again. An impressive range of emotions are explored given the nature of the movie. And ultimately, the whole spectacle is wonderful.

This is one franchise I will gladly keep following until it stops hitting it out of the park and that hasn’t happened yet. It accepts neither categorization nor convention and instead, it simply entertains without taking so much as a single breath between jokes, punches, etc. There isn’t a roller coaster with rapid enough twists and turns to merit being a metaphor for what this franchise does. I’m not a fan of most superhero movies and I hope the concept has almost outlived its day as the automatic profit machine of the industry so we can start seeing a little more variety. But the Deadpool series is so much more than just another superhero movie. And while it makes liberal use of jokes about, and references to, other storylines I personally know nothing about (I think most of them are X-Men related), it never seems to do so in a way that leaves me feeling on the outside looking in. At the end of the day, I can’t think of any valid criticism of this movie and I made a pretty determined effort to do so in the time since I watched it. If you can, I would be very interested to hear it.

The Usual Suspects (1995)

I know, I know. This is a classic and it’s criminal that I’ve lived this long without seeing it. But cut me a break; I wasn’t even ten years old when it originally came out and it has taken me some time to find my way to it as an adult. I suppose I should give the movie the benefit of the fact that it is a quarter century old and a lot has happened since then. For example, today Kevin Spacey is more to some folks than simply an incredibly gifted actor. But he certainly is that as well and he was awesome in this movie. The elapsed years have also given me the benefit of having seen a lot of movies that have likely stood on the shoulders of this one and others like it, which may explain why I was able to see the ending coming fairly early on. Usually I don’t have that ability.

In general, this movie was well acted and the plot very cleverly crafted. It was entertaining and enjoyable and I can understand why so many people love it – even in 2019. I will say that it didn’t overwhelm me from an emotional standpoint. Maybe if it had, my brain would have been distracted enough to prevent me from figuring out the ending as early as I did. But regardless, the movie certainly challenged itself and the audience more than most of the rehashed, formulaic crap we see today. And I believe it conquered that challenge, even if not in a totally transcendent way.

Bohemian Rhapsody (2018)

I don’t see many biopics and even fewer musical ones but Queen, or more specifically Freddie Mercury, has always captivated me so I decided to check this movie out. Freddie Mercury was acted very well, some of the supporting actors were also pretty solid, and the music was great, of course. But there is one thing that started gnawing at me early on and only got worse. For me, a movie of this nature is only the beginning; the first thing I did when I finished it was to google Queen and Freddie Mercury and start reading. And at that point, I quickly understood where that disconcerting feeling had been coming from.

Why? The movie changed a lot of facts for no apparent reason and based on my reading, it may have done the same with some of the less quantifiable aspects of who Mercury actually was as well. I didn’t find anything written about why most of these liberties were taken with the history of a man and the band that rode his legendary star power from very likely obscurity to “fame and fortune.” But I can’t help but feel like maybe it has to do with that old quote about history being written by the winners, applied to this particular situation on the basis of who is still alive and who is not. I’m not going to go into all the discrepancies I noticed because I don’t want to ruin the movie for anyone but there were quite a few if much of what I read had any credibility at all.

I don’t know how much of a hand the surviving band members had in making this movie but I understand it had to be made in such a way as to garner their approval so they would allow the music to be used – obviously an essential element. And I think that is probably the likeliest explanation of why the movie almost seemed to be trying to alter the characters involved to make the balance of the situation appear different. I get it; there were band members besides Freddie Mercury. To highlight their contributions would have been fine. But to cast unjustified aspersions on Mercury’s memory in an attempt to make others appear more significant or more responsible for the band’s otherworldly success does give off a hint of sour grapes. I would still say the movie is worth seeing for the combination of some very capable acting and the fun of seeing the music performed. But the whole thing did leave me with a funny taste in my mouth and the more I read about the real story the movie was based on, the more I realized why.