What I Spend On Groceries and How I Do It

A recent meal of turkey lasagna, roasted squash, and green peas (I probably wound up having seconds on the lasagna)

Happy Monday, Everyone! Here is the latest post in my Annual Expenses series. If you didn’t see the introduction post that summarizes all of my expenses, check it out here. I’ve been going into detail on one category each Monday. Over 2017 and 2018, I spent an average of $1700 per year on groceries and I believe I could spend a reasonable minimum of $1200 per year if I had to. This is one area that always blows me away when I read about what people typically spend on it. Supposedly the average is about $3000 per year, per person. Then again, the average American reportedly wastes about a pound of food per day, so that is part of the reason for such a high number. I do all I can to avoid EVER wasting food and probably throw away less than one item per month. But before I go any further, I do have to ‘fess up to one advantage. I eat three to five meals per week at restaurants in a typical week as part of my job, which saves me some food I would need to make at home. And actually, during 2017 I was traveling a lot more and probably ate twice that many meals. So admittedly, my spending would be higher if not for that. However, as a very physically active man, I also eat significantly more total calories than a typical person does and as a result, I believe things balance out to some degree.

As with most shopping, my grocery strategy begins at Costco. Yes, I am only a household of one. But there are still plenty of foods I am able to buy in bulk and consume quickly enough to avoid having them go bad. Some of the many items I can think of off the top of my head that I buy regularly include the mixed bags of organic spinach/kale/other stuff that tastes like grass clippings, tortillas, eggs, butter, cheese, coffee, olive oil, spices, boneless skinless chicken breasts, fish, and assorted frozen foods I can make once in a while when I’m feeling lazy. Absolutely every item I just listed is a great quality/price combination at Costco, with many of them being substantially cheaper than any competitor’s offerings. I don’t buy much produce at Costco, however. That doesn’t seem to be their strongest priced area.

If I don’t buy something at Costco, I go to HEB, a regional chain here in Texas that has solid selection and an “every day low pricing” model. When I lived in Wisconsin, there was a similarly excellent option called Woodman’s. Either way, I take the lazy approach of shopping at stores that offer the lowest prices most of the time rather than shopping at several different ones looking for sale prices that are occasionally a little bit lower. I know people who do things that way and there is certainly money to be saved, but I simply don’t have the time available to be able to execute that strategy.

At the grocery store, my focus is on buying mostly “raw materials,” which tend to be both the cheapest and the healthiest versions of foods. I buy the most in the produce section. Flexibility is key here. Everything has a peak season when it is plentiful and cheap and I plan my cooking around that to some extent. For example, when pineapples are less than $2, I buy them more often and sweeten up my green smoothies with them. And since lately avocados are about double what they are normally, I’ve been using them much less or skipping them altogether. After the produce section, I typically go to the meat section the next most, followed by the frozen section where I buy lots of frozen vegetables. These are a great value because they’re flash frozen almost immediately after being harvested, meaning they’re both fresh/nutritious and benefit from the economy of scale pricing that results from mass production. I do occasionally venture into the middle aisles, where the most processed food lives, but only for particular items when I need them, usually for a particular recipe.

In practice, this usually ends up being a couple trips to both Costco and HEB each week. If I’m just buying my regular stuff, I usually end up spending about $10-15 total on groceries each of these trips and $20-30 per week. Every now and again I stock up or buy special items for recipes and spend a little more. But I never feel like I have to deprive myself in any way to spend what I do on groceries. I guess the only caveat is that since I buy food mostly in raw, unprocessed form, I do spend a fair amount of time cooking. But since I enjoy doing that, and enjoy the results even more, I don’t really see that as a cost. That’s the advantage of learning to enjoy activities that happen to help you to live a better, healthier life and save money in the process.

Anyway, hopefully this gives someone an idea or two. Have a great Monday, Ya’ll!

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