How I’m Learning to Be Excited When Things Don’t Go My Way

Now there’s some excitement for you. I’m not the biggest NBA fan myself, but I do enjoy watching that bearded gentleman make fools of even the best defenders from time to time. – Image courtesy of Jean-Marc Buytaert

Anyone who knows me, or who has been reading this blog for a while, knows that I was divorced in 2016 and that while I was about as devastated as humanly possible at the time, I have since come to view it as one of the best things that has ever happened to me. No, that’s not a vindictive swipe at my ex-wife, who I still believe was (and likely still is) a very admirable and impressive woman in most ways. We are all flawed; she has things to work on just as I do. Anyway, without the inherent compromise of that relationship influencing things, my circumstances have since changed dramatically, in ways they likely never would have otherwise, and I have grown immensely in the process. Terribly heart wrenching sequence of events? Absolutely. Wonderful, life changing blessing? Also absolutely. Very few incredibly valuable lessons come cheap.

Recently I’ve had another apparent setback in the form of learning my days in my current job are numbered. Given that I mostly love it and regard it as by far the best job I’ve had to date, that could have been a devastating blow. But it didn’t hit me that way – not even when I first found out. And given what I’ve learned in recent years, I believe I’ve reacted correctly. Almost every time I’ve been knocked off course in life, I’ve soon found myself on a more productive one, and have usually enjoyed significant personal growth for having been through the experience as a bonus. I fully expect that this time will yield the same result and I firmly believe I’ll be writing a triumphant, ecstatic post about that in the coming weeks.

This got me thinking back to earlier parts of my life. For example, early in my grade school years, as most young lads do, I began to realize I was fascinated with certain aspects of women. Our school was small but there were a few young ladies I took a private interest in. At the time, I would have been thrilled if one of them had displayed a reciprocal interest in me – even if I didn’t understand exactly why I felt that way quite yet. But I was a shy, skinny kid with an acne problem and it didn’t happen. At the time, I thought that sucked. But thanks to the mixed blessing of Facebook, I’ve observed how time has treated most of them in the decades since. And you know what? Every single one of the women I’ve dated or had any sort of fun with has been substantially more attractive than the adult versions of any of the girls I lusted after as a boy. If my wish had been granted and one of them had shown an interest, who knows what would have happened? We may have turned into one of those “first and only love” couples and I may have missed out on the company of numerous much more attractive women – including ones I haven’t even met yet. My past disappointment has turned to present gratitude, and even relief. And as a side note, being a late bloomer rocks!

Fast forwarding to my graduation into the worst economy since the Great Depression, neither my then fiancé or I (yes, we did that way too young!) was able to get a good job. In fact, both of the jobs we did eventually manage to get were unfulfilling and paid around $20k a year less than the type of job a recent college graduate could expect to get in even a mediocre job market. However, we worked hard to differentiate ourselves, moved up steadily, and within only a handful of years, we both wound up making about double what great jobs would have paid had we been able to get them upon graduating – and with dramatic additional growth potential from there. Looking back, what if I had gotten that “good” job right off the bat? I see two likely outcomes. Instead of having a fire lit inside me, I probably would have gotten comfortable and even with better than average annual raises, today I would likely be making roughly half what I do now at best. And I definitely wouldn’t have benefited from the same “tough love” lessons that taught me how to not just stretch every dollar and save/invest the proceeds, but to do it almost effortlessly. I could literally have lost well over $100k of net worth in around half a decade if I had received the “good fortune” I wanted at the time.

You hear this plenty but I’m here to tell you that I’ve seen it time and time again in my own life; if something doesn’t work out, something better is probably going to happen instead. In this post, I’ve shared just a few of my own examples. I’m sure if you look back at your past, you will find some disappointments turned triumphs of your own. I’m personally not at the point where bad news equals me being excited – yet. But if I can turn my recent career setback into a substantial upgrade, as it looks like I very well may, then the evidence supporting that mentality will be just about stacked to the ceiling. We will all be knocked down in life. Part of being the man I want to be involves viewing it as an opportunity, getting back up, and making something amazing happen. Mentally, I’m working on making that process automatic. I encourage all of you to do the same. Remember, successful people have bad days too. But they know how to turn present pain into future success. And that is what sets them apart from the herd.

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